Cutaneous hemosiderosis in chronic venous insufficiency: A review

  • Melissa Ashley Nickles University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Maria M. Tsoukas, MD, PhD University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago – Dermatology, Chicago, IL
  • Marylee A. Braniecki, MD University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago – Pathology, Chicago, IL
  • Igor Altman, DO, MBA University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago – Surgery, Chicago, IL

Abstract

Hemosiderosis is the deposition of hemosiderin, a storage form of iron derived from the breakdown of erythrocytes. This process commonly occurs in patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) due to venous hypertension and vascular ectasia. Cutaneous accumulation of hemosiderin in CVI causes brown hyperpigmentation and contributes to lipodermatosclerosis and ulceration, further highlighting the pathogenic role of iron metabolism in these disorders. In this review, we examine the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of hemosiderosis in CVI, summarize its management and prevention strategies, and explore its impact on quality of life.

Published
2022-05-19
How to Cite
NicklesM., TsoukasM., BranieckiM., and AltmanI. “Cutaneous Hemosiderosis in Chronic Venous Insufficiency: A Review”. Osteopathic Family Physician, Vol. 14, no. 3, May 2022, pp. 22–26, doi:10.33181/13072.
Section
Review Articles